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‘Gartner predicts the end of the IT boom’

The end of growth in the IT industry is inevitable and there will be no turning back, says Gartner, the global information and communications technology firm.

The data centre industry, it predicts, will be the dominant industry in the world by 2030, driven by cloud computing and robotics, and with a 50-50 split between software and hardware.

“The end of cloud computing will come and it will be in a few years,” said Gartmer.

The rise of robotics in manufacturing and the internet of things (IoT) are accelerating the shift, said Gabor Szabo, the company’s president and CEO. “

But if it is happening now, I am afraid we will be late to the party.”

The rise of robotics in manufacturing and the internet of things (IoT) are accelerating the shift, said Gabor Szabo, the company’s president and CEO.

“It is happening at a very fast pace, but I think it is going be very gradual,” he added. “

The global manufacturing and supply chain is growing by 8.5 per cent annually and the software and services sector by a whopping 19 per cent, according to the McKinsey Global Institute (KGI). “

It is happening at a very fast pace, but I think it is going be very gradual,” he added.

The global manufacturing and supply chain is growing by 8.5 per cent annually and the software and services sector by a whopping 19 per cent, according to the McKinsey Global Institute (KGI).

The internet of everything is also taking off, said KGI.

The total number of devices in use today is 5.7 billion and this is expected to grow to 6.7 trillion devices in 2020, according KGI, with the potential for 5.9 trillion devices worldwide by 2020.

The internet and robotics are creating jobs, said Szabo. “

This will have an impact on the process and the quality of the finished product.”

The internet and robotics are creating jobs, said Szabo.

“As robotics advances, we are seeing more and more opportunities for skilled workers, who will also be required to become skilled consumers,” he said.

This means an increase in the number of jobs requiring a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree, as well as more jobs requiring an MBA and an MBA in software engineering.

“When you look at the global job market, we estimate that we have 1.2 billion jobs in manufacturing,” said Szabo.

“If we were to add to this the number in the supply chain, that would add a further 1.3 billion jobs.”

The global employment is expected by 2020 to reach 12.5 billion, with nearly half of these jobs requiring at least a bachelor degree.

The internet will play a big role in this, according Gabor.

“We are going to see more demand for skills in software,” he told The Times.

“This is going away as we move to the cloud, which will change the way we work, the way businesses interact with each other, the business model,” he explained. “

People are looking for ways to do things faster, better and cheaper, but this also means they want to use their knowledge.”

“This is going away as we move to the cloud, which will change the way we work, the way businesses interact with each other, the business model,” he explained.

Gartners projections for 2020-2025 suggest that more than a quarter of the world’s population will be living in cities by 2020, with more than 90 per cent of these cities being located in the US, Russia and China. “

At the same time, you can now work from anywhere.”

Gartners projections for 2020-2025 suggest that more than a quarter of the world’s population will be living in cities by 2020, with more than 90 per cent of these cities being located in the US, Russia and China.

“That is a massive shift in our thinking,” said Srinivas Agrawal, vice-president at McKinsey India.

The IT sector is not going away but it is being disrupted.””

What we are witnessing is a shift away from cities and toward the internet and cloud.

The IT sector is not going away but it is being disrupted.”